An Internet Transition Plan
RFC 5211

 
Document Type RFC - Informational (July 2008; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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IESG IESG state RFC 5211 (Informational)
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Network Working Group                                          J. Curran
Request for Comments: 5211                                     July 2008
Category: Informational

                      An Internet Transition Plan

Status of This Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

IESG Note

   This RFC is not a candidate for any level of Internet Standard.  The
   IETF disclaims any knowledge of the fitness of this RFC for any
   purpose and notes that the decision to publish is not based on IETF
   review apart from IESG review for conflict with IETF work.  RFC
   Editor has chosen to publish this document at its discretion.  See
   RFC 3932 for more information.

Abstract

   This memo provides one possible plan for transitioning the Internet
   from a predominantly IPv4-based connectivity model to a predominantly
   IPv6-based connectivity model.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................2
      1.1. Requirements Language ......................................2
   2. A Phased Transition Model .......................................2
      2.1. Preparation Phase - Present to December 2009 ...............3
      2.2. Transition Phase - January 2010 to December 2011 ...........4
      2.3. Post-Transition Phase - January 2012 to the Future .........4
   3. Summary .........................................................5
   4. Security Considerations .........................................5
   5. IANA Considerations .............................................5
   6. Acknowledgments .................................................6
   7. References ......................................................6
      7.1. Normative References .......................................6
      7.2. Informative References .....................................6

Curran                       Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 5211              An Internet Transition Plan              July 2008

1.  Introduction

   This memo provides one possible plan for transitioning the Internet
   from a predominantly IPv4-based connectivity model to a predominantly
   IPv6-based connectivity model.

   Other transition plans are possible and this purely informational
   document does not create an obligation on any party to undertake any
   of the actions specified herein, and the use of requirements language
   per RFC 2119 is only for the purpose of clearly describing the
   proposed transition plan in unambiguous terms.

   The motivation for an Internet-wide transition plan is to facilitate
   coordination of expectations among innumerable, highly decentralized
   entities during a period of significant change, thus reducing risk to
   the defining Internet property of universal connectivity.

   The purpose of specifying this particular transition plan is to allow
   for overall assessment of the challenges of accomplishing the desired
   transition and to continue the discussion of Internet-wide transition
   plans in general.

1.1.  Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].
   RFC 2119 defines the use of these key words to help make the intent
   of Standards Track documents as clear as possible.  While not a
   Standards Track document, the same key words are used in this
   document only for sake of clarity in describing the proposed
   transition plan.

2.  A Phased Transition Model

   It is not reasonable to specify the changes that each and every
   system connected to the Internet must undergo in order to achieve the
   desired transition, as the number of connected systems precludes
   creating one plan that contains such a level of detail.  Further,
   while there are common scenarios that may be specified for
   transitioning individual networks (refer to [RFC3750] and [RFC4057]
   for examples), the specific timeline and mechanisms utilized for a
   given network will be unique.  Despite these challenges, it is
   necessary to coordinate expectations on an overall basis so that
   Internet-wide connectivity is maintained throughout the transition.

Curran                       Informational                      [Page 2]
RFC 5211              An Internet Transition Plan              July 2008

   This document specifies a three-phase transition plan that includes
   preparation, transition, and post-transition phases, and delineates
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