On the Dynamic/Automatic Configuration of IPv6 Hosts
draft-gont-v6ops-host-configuration-01

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Last updated 2017-03-13
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IPv6 Operations Working Group (v6ops)                            F. Gont
Internet-Draft                                    SI6 Networks / UTN-FRH
Intended status: Best Current Practice                        G. Doering
Expires: September 14, 2017                                  SpaceNet AG
                                                         M. Garcia Corbo
                                                                 SITRANS
                                                                 G. Gont
                                                            SI6 Networks
                                                          March 13, 2017

          On the Dynamic/Automatic Configuration of IPv6 Hosts
                 draft-gont-v6ops-host-configuration-01

Abstract

   IPv6 has two different mechanisms for dynamic/automatic host
   configuration: SLAAC and DHCPv6.  These two mechanisms allow for the
   configuration of IPv6 addresses and a number of network parameters.
   While there is overlap in the parameters that can be configured via
   these two protocols, different implementations support only subsets
   of such parameters with either mechanism, or have no support for
   DHCPv6 at all.  This document analyzes a problem that arises from
   this situation, and mandates that all host implementations support
   RFC 6105 (DNS options for SLAAC) and the stateless DHCPv6
   functionality in RFC 3315.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 14, 2017.

Gont, et al.           Expires September 14, 2017               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft    Dynamic/Automatic Host Configuration        March 2017

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Current Requirements regarding RDNSS and Stateless DHCPv6 . .   4
   4.  Requirements for IPv6 Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Requirements for IPv6 Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   IPv6 has two different mechanisms for dynamic/automatic host
   configuration: Stateless Address Autoconfiguration (SLAAC) [RFC4862]
   and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6) [RFC3315].
   SLAAC allows for distributed address assignment (where each host
   automatically configures its own IPv6 addresses) and basic network
   configuration (such as recursive DNS servers and DNS search lists).
   On the other hand, DHCPv6 provides for centralized address assignment
   (the DHCPv6 server leases IPv6 addresses to hosts) and richer network
   configuration (NTP servers, web proxys, etc.).

   Traditionally, SLAAC has been seen as a more lightweight mechanism,
   suitable for resource-constrained devices, while DHCPv6 has been seen
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