Seamless OAuth 2.0 Client Assertion Grant
draft-hevroni-oauth-seamless-flow-00

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Last updated 2018-03-24
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Network Working Group                                    O. Levi Hevroni
Internet-Draft                                         Soluto by Asurion
Intended status: Informational                            March 25, 2018
Expires: September 26, 2018

               Seamless OAuth 2.0 Client Assertion Grant
                  draft-hevroni-oauth-seamless-flow-00

Abstract

   This specification defines the use of a One Time Password, encoded as
   JSON Web Token (JWS) Bearer Token, as a means for requesting an OAuth
   2.0 access token as well as for client authentication.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 26, 2018.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Motivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.2.  Existing Solutions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
       1.2.1.  Client Credentials grant  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
       1.2.2.  Device grant  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
       1.2.3.  JWT Client Assertion  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.3.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Note to Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  HTTP Parameter Bindings for Transporting Assertions . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Using OTP JWS for client authentication . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  JWS format and request processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  One Time Password generation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  Creating the JWS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.3.  Request processing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     5.1.  Replay Attacks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     5.2.  Compromised Signing key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.3.  Man in the Middle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.4.  Reverse Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.5.  OTP Generation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.6.  Signing Key Consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       5.6.1.  Generation and Storage  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       5.6.2.  Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   7.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     7.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     7.2.  URIs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10

1.  Introduction

1.1.  Motivation

   Authentication is a crucial part of modern application.  There are
   various authentication methods for client side applications, and all
   those methods requires user interaction (e.g. login).  This is due to
   the fact that there is no secure way to embed credentials in the
   application code.

   While asking the user to login in order to authenticate the app is a
   strong authentication solution, it has impact on the application
   behavior.  A login is just another step the user has to complete in
   order to use the apps, which users don't always like to fulfill.

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   Also, there are cases for applications without any UI, for example -
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