Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN): Relay Extensions to Session Traversal Utilities for NAT (STUN)
draft-ietf-tram-turnbis-27

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (tram WG)
Last updated 2019-07-11 (latest revision 2019-06-26)
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Proposed Standard
Formats plain text xml pdf html bibtex
Reviews
Stream WG state Submitted to IESG for Publication
Document shepherd Brandon Williams
Shepherd write-up Show (last changed 2019-03-01)
IESG IESG state IESG Evaluation::Revised I-D Needed
Consensus Boilerplate Yes
Telechat date
Has 3 DISCUSSes. Has enough positions to pass once DISCUSS positions are resolved.
Responsible AD Magnus Westerlund
Send notices to Brandon Williams <brandon.williams@akamai.com>
IANA IANA review state IANA OK - Actions Needed
IANA action state None
TRAM WG                                                    T. Reddy, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                    McAfee
Obsoletes: 5766, 6156 (if approved)                     A. Johnston, Ed.
Intended status: Standards Track                    Villanova University
Expires: December 29, 2019                                   P. Matthews
                                                          Alcatel-Lucent
                                                            J. Rosenberg
                                                             jdrosen.net
                                                           June 27, 2019

 Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN): Relay Extensions to Session
                   Traversal Utilities for NAT (STUN)
                       draft-ietf-tram-turnbis-27

Abstract

   If a host is located behind a NAT, then in certain situations it can
   be impossible for that host to communicate directly with other hosts
   (peers).  In these situations, it is necessary for the host to use
   the services of an intermediate node that acts as a communication
   relay.  This specification defines a protocol, called TURN (Traversal
   Using Relays around NAT), that allows the host to control the
   operation of the relay and to exchange packets with its peers using
   the relay.  TURN differs from other relay control protocols in that
   it allows a client to communicate with multiple peers using a single
   relay address.

   The TURN protocol was designed to be used as part of the ICE
   (Interactive Connectivity Establishment) approach to NAT traversal,
   though it also can be used without ICE.

   This document obsoletes RFC 5766 and RFC 6156.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

Reddy, et al.           Expires December 29, 2019               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                    TURN                         June 2019

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 29, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   3.  Overview of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     3.1.  Transports  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.2.  Allocations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     3.3.  Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
     3.4.  Send Mechanism  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     3.5.  Channels  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
     3.6.  Unprivileged TURN Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     3.7.  Avoiding IP Fragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     3.8.  RTP Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
     3.9.  Happy Eyeballs for TURN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   4.  Discovery of TURN server  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
     4.1.  TURN URI Scheme Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.  General Behavior  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   6.  Allocations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   7.  Creating an Allocation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
     7.1.  Sending an Allocate Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
     7.2.  Receiving an Allocate Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  28
     7.3.  Receiving an Allocate Success Response  . . . . . . . . .  33
     7.4.  Receiving an Allocate Error Response  . . . . . . . . . .  34
   8.  Refreshing an Allocation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  36
     8.1.  Sending a Refresh Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  36
Show full document text