Requirements for IPv6 Routers
draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv6rtr-reqs-00

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (v6ops WG)
Last updated 2017-05-05
Replaces draft-ali-ipv6rtr-reqs, draft-v6ops-ipv6rtr-reqs
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Network Working Group                                       Z. Kahn, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                  LinkedIn
Intended status: Informational                        J. Brzozowski, Ed.
Expires: November 6, 2017                                        Comcast
                                                           R. White, Ed.
                                                                LinkedIn
                                                             May 5, 2017

                     Requirements for IPv6 Routers
                    draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv6rtr-reqs-00

Abstract

   The Internet is not one network, but rather a collection of networks.
   The interconnected nature of these networks, and the nature of the
   interconneted systems that make up these networks, is often more
   fragile than it appears.  Perhaps "robust but fragile" is an
   overstatement, but the actions of each vendor, implementor, and
   operator in such an interconneted environment can have a major impact
   on the stability of the overall Internet (as a system).  The
   widespread adoption of IPv6 could, particularly, disrupt network
   operations, in a way that impacts the entire system.

   This time of transition is an opportune time to take stock of lessons
   learned through the operation of large scale networks on IPv4, and
   consider how to apply these lessons to IPv6.  This document provides
   an overview of the design and architectural decisions that attend
   IPv6 deployment, and a set of IPv6 requirements for routers,
   switches, and middleboxes deployed in IPv6 networks.  The hope of the
   editors and contributors is to provide the neccessary background to
   guide equipment manufacturers, protocol implemenetors, and network
   operators in effective IPv6 deployment.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

Kahn, et al.            Expires November 6, 2017                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        Requirements for IPv6 Routers             May 2017

   This Internet-Draft will expire on November 6, 2017.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Contributors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.2.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Review of the Internet Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.1.  Robustness Principle  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Complexity  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
       2.2.1.  Elegance  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
       2.2.2.  Tradeoffs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     2.3.  Layered Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     2.4.  Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   3.  Requirements Related to Device Management and Security  . . .  11
     3.1.  Programmable Device Access  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.2.  Human Readable Device Access  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     3.3.  Supporting Zero Touch Provisioning for Connected Devices   12
     3.4.  Device Protection against Denial of Service Attacks . . .  13
   4.  Requirements Related to Telemetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
     4.1.  Device State and Traceablity  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
     4.2.  Topology State and Traceability . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   5.  Requirements Related to IPv6 Forwarding and Addressing  . . .  15
     5.1.  The IPv6 Address is not a Host Identifier . . . . . . . .  16
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