File-Like ICN Collection (FLIC)
draft-irtf-icnrg-flic-01

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Last updated 2017-12-26
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ICNRG                                                        C. Tschudin
Internet-Draft                                       University of Basel
Intended status: Informational                                   C. Wood
Expires: June 29, 2018                   University of California Irvine
                                                       December 26, 2017

                    File-Like ICN Collection (FLIC)
                        draft-irtf-icnrg-flic-01

Abstract

   This document describes a bare bones "index table"-approach for
   organizing a set of ICN data objects into a large, File-Like ICN
   Collection (FLIC).

   At the core of this collection is a so called manifest which acts as
   the collection's root node.  The manifest contains an index table
   with pointers, each pointer being a hash value pointing to either a
   final data block or another index table node.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on June 29, 2018.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect

Tschudin & Wood           Expires June 29, 2018                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                  ICN-FLIC                   December 2017

   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  FLIC as a Distributed Data Structure  . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Design goals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  File-Like ICN Collection (FLIC) Format  . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.1.  Use of hash-valued pointers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.2.  Creating a FLIC data structure  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     2.3.  Reconstructing the collection's data  . . . . . . . . . .   7
     2.4.  Metadata and Extensibility  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     2.5.  FLIC Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     2.6.  Locating FLIC leaf and manifest nodes . . . . . . . . . .  10
   3.  Advanced uses of FLIC manifests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.1.  Seeking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.2.  Block-level de-duplication  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     3.3.  Growing ICN collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     3.4.  Re-publishing a FLIC under a new name . . . . . . . . . .  12
     3.5.  Data Chunks of variable size  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   4.  Encoding  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     4.1.  Example Encoding for CCNx1.0  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     4.2.  Example Encoding for NDN  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   6.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     6.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     6.2.  URIs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15

1.  Introduction

   ICN architectures such as Content-Centric Networking (CCN)
   [I-D.irtf-icnrg-ccnxsemantics] and Named Data Networking
   [NamedDataNetworking] are well suited for static content
   distribution.  Each piece of (possibly immutable) static content is
   assigned a name by its producer.  Consumers fetch this content using
   said name.  Optionally, consumers may specify the full name of
   content, which includes its name and a unique (with overwhelming
   probability) cryptographic digest of said content.  (See
   [I-D.irtf-icnrg-terminology] for a formal definition of "full name".)

   To enable requests with full names, consumers need a priori knowledge
   of content digests.  Manifests, or catalogs, are data structures
   commonly proposed to transport this information.  Typically,
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