Remote Method Invocation in ICN
draft-kutscher-icnrg-rice-00

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ICNRG                                                            M. Krol
Internet-Draft                                 University College London
Intended status: Experimental                                   K. Habak
Expires: April 4, 2019                   Georgia Institute of Technology
                                                                 D. Oran
                                       Network Systems Research & Design
                                                             D. Kutscher
                                                                  Huawei
                                                               I. Psaras
                                               University College London
                                                        October 01, 2018

                    Remote Method Invocation in ICN
                      draft-kutscher-icnrg-rice-00

Abstract

   Information Centric Networking has been proposed as a new network
   layer for the Internet, capable of encompassing the full range of
   networking facilities provided by the current IP architecture.  In
   addition to the obvious content-fetching use cases which have been
   the subject of a large body of work, ICN has also shown promise as a
   substrate to effectively support remote computation, both pure
   functional programming (as exemplified by Named Function Networking)
   and more general remote invocation models such as RPC and web
   transactions.  Providing a unified remote computation capability in
   ICN presents some unique challenges, among which are timer
   management, client authorization, and binding to state held by
   servers, while maintaining the advantages of ICN protocol designs
   like CCN and NDN.  This document specifies a unified approach to
   remote method invocation in ICN that exploits the attractive ICN
   properties of name-based routing, receiver-driven flow and congestion
   control, flow balance, and object-oriented security while presenting
   a natural programming model to the application developer.

Status of This Memo

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Krol, et al.              Expires April 4, 2019                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft       Remote Method Invocation in ICN        October 2018

   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 4, 2019.

Copyright Notice

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology and Design Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.1.  Design Goals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   3.  Protocol  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.1.  Thunks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.2.  Naming  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     3.3.  Handshake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     3.4.  Shared Secret Derivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     3.5.  Client Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.6.  Input Parameters  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.7.  Dynamic Content Retrieval Using Thunks  . . . . . . . . .  11
   4.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   5.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     5.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     5.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15

1.  Introduction

   Much of today's network traffic consists of data sent for processing
   to the cloud and web-servers exchanging high volumes of dynamically
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