The "safe" HTTP Preference
draft-nottingham-safe-hint-02

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (candidate for appsawg WG)
Author Mark Nottingham 
Last updated 2014-08-04 (latest revision 2014-05-30)
Stream IETF
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Network Working Group                                      M. Nottingham
Internet-Draft
Intended status: Informational                              May 30, 2014
Expires: December 1, 2014

                       The "safe" HTTP Preference
                     draft-nottingham-safe-hint-02

Abstract

   This specification defines a "safe" preference for HTTP, expressing a
   user preference to avoid "objectionable" content.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 1, 2014.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Notational Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  The "safe" Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     5.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     5.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Appendix A.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Appendix B.  Setting "safe" from Web Browsers . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Appendix C.  Using "safe" on Your Web Site  . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   Many Web sites have a "safe" mode, to assist those who don't want to
   be exposed (or have their children exposed) to "objectionable"
   content.  YouTube [youtube], Yahoo!  Search [yahoo], Google Search
   [google], Bing Search [bing], and many other services have such a
   setting.

   However, those who wish to have this preference honoured need to go
   to each Web site in turn, navigate to the appropriate page, (possibly
   creating an account along the way) to get a cookie [RFC6265] set in
   the browser.  They would need to do this for each browser on every
   device they use.

   This is onerous to achieve effectively, because there are so many
   permutations of sites, user agents and devices.

   If this preference is proactively advertised by the user agent,
   things become much simpler.  A user agent that supports doing so
   (whether it be an individual browser, or through an Operating System
   HTTP library) need only be configured once to assure that the
   preference is advertised to all sites that understand and choose to
   act upon it.  It's no longer necessary to go to each site that has
   potentially "unsafe" content and configure a "safe" mode.

   Furthermore, a proxy (for example, at a school) can be used to ensure
   that the preference is associated with all (unencrypted) requests
   flowing through it, helping to assure that clients behind it are not
   exposed to "objectionable" content.

   This specification defines how to associate this preference with a
   request, as a HTTP Preference [I-D.snell-http-prefer].

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   Note that this approach does not define what "safe" is; rather, it is
   interpreted within the scope of each Web site that chooses to act
   upon this information (or not).  As such, it does not require
   agreement upon what "safe" is, nor does it require application of
   policy in the user agent or an intermediary (which can be problematic
   for many reasons).

1.1.  Notational Conventions

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
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