The text/markdown Media Type
draft-ietf-appsawg-text-markdown-01

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (appsawg WG)
Author Sean Leonard 
Last updated 2014-09-09
Replaces draft-seantek-text-markdown-media-type
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Informational
Formats pdf htmlized (tools) htmlized bibtex
Reviews
Stream WG state WG Document
Document shepherd Murray Kucherawy
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Applications Area Working Group                               S. Leonard
Internet-Draft                                             Penango, Inc.
Intended Status: Informational                         September 9, 2014
Expires: March 13, 2015                                                 

                      The text/markdown Media Type
                draft-ietf-appsawg-text-markdown-01.txt

Abstract

   This document registers the text/markdown media type for use with
   Markdown, a family of plain text formatting syntaxes that optionally
   can be converted to formal markup languages such as HTML.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors. All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document. Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

 

Leonard                   Exp. March 13, 2015                   [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        The text/markdown Media Type     September 9, 2014

1. Introduction

   In computer systems, textual data is stored and processed using a
   continuum of techniques. On the one end is plain text: a linear
   sequence of characters in some character set (code), possibly
   interrupted by line breaks, page breaks, or other control characters.
   Plain text provides /some/ fixed facilities for formatting
   instructions, namely codes in the character set that have meanings
   other than "represent this character on the output medium"; however,
   these facilities are not particularly extensible. Compare with
   [RFC6838] Section 4.2.1. (Applications may neuter the effects of
   these special characters by prohibiting them or by ignoring their
   dictated meanings, as is the case with how modern applications treat
   most control characters in US-ASCII.) On this end, any text reader or
   editor that interprets the character set can be used to see or
   manipulate the text. If some characters are corrupted, the corruption
   is unlikely to affect the ability of a computer system to process the
   text (even if the human meaning is changed).

   On the other end is binary format: a sequence of instructions
   intended for some computer application to interpret and act upon.
   Binary formats are flexible in that they can store non-textual data
   efficiently (perhaps storing no text at all, or only storing certain
   kinds of text for very specialized purposes). Binary formats require
   an application to be coded specifically to handle the format; no
   partial interoperability is possible. Furthermore, if even one byte
   or bit are corrupted in a binary format, it may prevent an
   application from processing any of the data correctly.

   Between these two extremes lies formatted text, i.e., text that
   includes non-textual information coded in a particular way, that
   affects the interpretation of the text by computer programs.
   Formatted text is distinct from plain text and binary format in that
   the non-textual information is encoded into textual characters, which
   are assigned specialized meanings /not/ defined by the character set.
   With a regular text editor and a standard keyboard (or other standard
   input mechanism), a user can enter these textual characters to
   express the non-textual meanings. For example, a character like "<"
   no longer means "LESS-THAN SIGN"; it means the start of a tag or
   element that affects the document in some way.

   On the formal end of the spectrum is markup, a family of languages
   for annotating a document in such a way that the annotations are
   syntactically distinguishable from the text. Markup languages are
   (reasonably) well-specified and tend to follow (mostly) standardized
   syntax rules. Examples of markup languages include SGML, HTML, XML,
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